Dutch Studies Program Spring and Summer 2017

Dutch Language Courses:

Dutch 2 – Elementary Dutch

Prerequisites: Dutch 1 or equivalent

Dutch 2 is a continuation of Dutch 1. Students’ knowledge of Dutch vocabulary and grammar will be expanded and put into practice. As in Dutch 1, the focus lies on further developing speaking and writing skills. Each week is dedicated to a theme, which forms the heart of the readings and discussions. Students will be able to engage in conversations in Dutch and write about various topics covered in class, such as geography of the Low Countries, history, Vincent van Gogh, the Dutch cuisine, the constitutional monarchy, and more. Students will conclude this semester by giving a short presentation in Dutch.

Instructor: Esmée van der Hoeven, M-W 12-2P, F 1-2P, 186 BARROWS, 5 units.

 

Dutch 100 – Dutch for Reading Knowledge

Prerequisites: None

This is a course designed for students, primarily graduate students, who want to be able to read Dutch for research purposes. The course is taught in English and targeted at students who have no knowledge of Dutch, however, students who wish to solidify their knowledge of Dutch grammar and their Dutch reading skills, are welcome to participate. By focusing on reading strategies and analyzing texts on sentence and word level, students will develop their reading and translation skills in Dutch. A lot of attention is paid to grammar, syntax and basic Dutch vocabulary. This course works with authentic texts (book reviews, newspaper articles, scholarly pieces). Students are welcome to bring in texts or topics for texts in their own field of study.

Instructor: Esmée van der Hoeven, M-W-F 4-5P, 189 DWINELLE, 3 units.

 

Dutch 125 – Conversation and Composition

Prerequisites: Dutch 110 or equivalent

In this advanced language course we proceed with the patterns of Dutch 110, although instead of giving frequent presentations, the emphasis will now be placed on weekly writing assignments and intense conversation. Students will be introduced to different types of texts and will learn different styles and practices in writing. A reader with various reading materials (i.e. articles, book reviews, literature, scholarly pieces) will form the basis for the writings and conversations.

Instructor: Esmée van der Hoeven, M-W-F 11-12P, 47 EVANS, 4 units.

 

Courses in Dutch History, Culture, Linguistics and Literature: (in English)

Dutch 166 – Anne Frank and After: Dutch Literature and Film on the Holocaust

“In spite of everything, I still believe that people are good at heart.” For many, this sentence sums up the basic idea of Anne Frank’s diary. Yet, if we take into account the horrors that Anne Frank experienced, a different quote from her diary seems more appropriate: “There’s a destructive urge in people, the urge to rage, murder and kill.” These harsh words will form the basis of our critical reflection on the German occupation of the Netherlands during World War II. Using original documents, film and literature we will analyze the German invasion, the Dutch resistance and collaboration, the horrors of the Nazi regime and the Holocaust. Dutch 166 satisfies the L&S Breadth Requirement for Arts & Literature. All readings and discussions in English.

Instructor: Jeroen Dewulf, M-W-F 3-4PM, 183 DWINELLE.

 

HA 262: Rubens Graduate Seminar: Renaissance Art and Science: Flemish Scientific Instruments in Context

This course starts from the assumption that art and science where strongly related in the Renaissance, which we illustrate by studying a large corpus of scientific instruments, such as astrolabes, globes, sundials and armillary spheres. Representing the concept of ‘materialised knowledge’ we approach them both conceptually – as carriers of ideas – and materially. There is a particular emphasis on the ‘Northern Renaissance’ and the Flemish context: between c. 1525 and c. 1580 the university city of Louvain became Europe’s most important center for instrument making partly due to the research and technical skills of Gerard Mercator (1512-1594) and Gemma Frisius (1508-1555). This high reputation is due in equal measure to the combination of the beauty and the precision of these instruments. The decorative aspects took their inspiration from contemporary manuals by Antwerp artists, while their functional aspects embodied the most up-to-date knowledge of the time as distilled by contemporary mathematical practitioners. It is this perfect harmony of aesthetics and science that made the Louvain instruments so sought after in the European market. Many instruments were also sold in Antwerp via the Plantin Press to Spanish collectors. The newly built library of Philip’s II Escorial housed many Flemish instruments. The syllabus will also elaborate on representations of these instruments in paintings from the middle ages up to the 17th century, such as the Antwerp Cabinet interiors or the Rubens-Brueghel allegory of the senses, among others. All readings and discussions in English.

Instructor: Visiting Professor Koenraad Van Cleempoel, Thursday | 2 – 5pm

 

Dutch Studies Summer Course

Dutch 177 – The Amsterdam-Brussels Connection: History, Art and Identity in the Heart of Europe

Introduce yourself to the cultural and political identity of the Low Countries: the Netherlands and Belgium. The course begins in Amsterdam, the world’s most liberal city, from where we explore the Netherlands. After spending more than two weeks in the Netherlands, we will continue our journey in Flanders, the Dutch speaking region of Belgium, where we will be based in the city of Antwerp. On our way, we will trace important cultural, historical and political developments in European history and culture from medieval Flanders, the Dutch Golden Age, World War I and II up to contemporary multilingual, social and European identity of Belgium and the Netherlands. Daily fieldtrips take us to The Hague, Utrecht, Delft, Rotterdam, Middelburg, Brussels, Ghent, Leuven, Bruges and many other places, where we will visit a range of world famous art museums, churches and historical sites. Guided visits to the Dutch House of Representatives in The Hague and the European Parliament in Brussels are also included.

The Travel/Study Course Dutch 177 is open to students from all departments on the Berkeley campus as well as students from other universities, also outside the United States. It satisfies the UC Berkeley Arts & Literature or Historical Studies L&S Breadth Requirement, and it is also part of the Dutch Studies Minor or Major. Students from other departments are encouraged to consult with their advisor to see which other major/minor this program may fulfill. Visiting students are encouraged to talk to their advisor about transfer of credit to their home institution. This course has no requirements. No language-teaching is involved.

Instructor: Esmée van der Hoeven. 6 units. July 2017.

 

Dutch Studies Major and Minor

DUTCH MAJOR:

Prerequisite: Elementary Dutch 1 and Elementary Dutch 2 or equivalent.

The student is expected to complete a minimum of 30 upper division units. Of these the following isrequired:

  • Advanced Dutch 110

Additional courses to be selected from the following list to complete the major:

  • Conversation and Composition Dutch 125
  • The Structure of Modern Dutch 107
  • Dutch for Reading Knowledge 100
  • Topics in Dutch Literature Dutch 140
  • Travel/Study Course Dutch 177
  • Senior Thesis Dutch 190
  • One course in the Dutch 160-series (may be repeated as topics change)
  • One course in the Dutch 170-series (may be repeated as topics change)
  • A maximum of two directly related upper-division courses outside the Department, with approval by the Program Director.

 

DUTCH MINOR

Prerequisite: Elementary Dutch 1 and Elementary Dutch 2 or equivalent.

The student is expected to complete 5 upper-division courses from the following:

  • Advanced Dutch 110
  • Dutch for Reading Knowledge 100
  • The Structure of Modern Dutch 107
  • Conversation and Composition Dutch 125
  • Topics in Dutch Literature Dutch 140
  • Travel/Study Course Dutch 177
  • One course in the Dutch 160-series (may be repeated as topics change)
  • One course in the Dutch 170-series (may be repeated as topics change)
  • One directly related upper-division course outside the Department, with approval by the Program Director.