Dutch Studies Program Spring and Summer 2018

Dutch Language Courses

 

Dutch 1 – Elementary Dutch

Prerequisites: None

In this beginner’s course, students will familiarize themselves with the basics of Dutch: its sounds and spelling, its grammatical structure, and its vocabulary. The class focuses on oral communication with an emphasis on vocabulary: learning words and learning how to use these words. By reading texts and dialogues (and listening to the audio version), students will build their vocabulary. In class they will get the opportunity to practice their newly learned words and phrases. By the end of the semester, students will be able to express themselves in speaking and in writing about a variety of topics, including introducing yourself, time, living, studying, traveling, and talking about present and past situations.
Esmée van der Hoeven, M-W 2-4P, F 3-4P, 61 EVANS, 5 units.

Dutch 2 – Elementary Dutch

Prerequisites: Dutch 1 or equivalent

Dutch 2 is a continuation of Dutch 1. Students’ knowledge of Dutch vocabulary and grammar will be expanded and put into practice. As in Dutch 1, the focus lies on further developing speaking and writing skills. Each week is dedicated to a theme, which forms the heart of the readings and discussions. Students will be able to engage in conversations in Dutch and write about various topics covered in class. Students will conclude this semester by giving a short presentation in Dutch.
Esmée van der Hoeven, M-W 12-2P, 235 DWINELLE, F 1-2P, 179 DWINELLE, 5 units.

Dutch 100 – Dutch for Reading Knowledge

Prerequisites: None

This is a course designed for students, primarily graduate students, who want to be able to read Dutch for research purposes. The course is taught in English and targeted at students who have no knowledge of Dutch, however, students who wish to solidify their knowledge of Dutch grammar and their Dutch reading skills, are welcome to participate. By focusing on reading strategies and analyzing texts on sentence and word level, students will develop their reading and translation skills in Dutch. A lot of attention is paid to grammar, syntax and basic Dutch vocabulary. This course works with authentic texts (book reviews, newspaper articles, scholarly pieces). Students are welcome to bring in texts or topics for texts in their own field of study.
Esmée van der Hoeven, M-W- F 4-5P, 189 DWINELLE, 3 units.

 

Courses in Dutch History & Culture (in English):

 

Dutch DUTCH C164 – THE INDONESIAN CONNECTION: The Dutch East Indies in a Postcolonial Perspective

This course focuses on literature and film about the Dutch colonial history of Indonesia, the former Dutch East Indies. We will cover five novels – all of them landmarks in Dutch literature (in English translation) – in their historical and cultural context. After a general introduction on the Dutch colonial policy in the context of the East India Company, we begin the course with Multatuli’s Max Havelaar (1860), a novel in which the author accuses his own country of being a “pirate-state, oppressing the Javanese people”. Other novels are Louis Couperus’ The Hidden Force (1900), a remarkable record of Javanese resistance to colonial oppression in the form of magical intimidation and Hella Haasse’s Forever a Stranger (1948), an impressive account of the widespread disillusionment among Dutch residents in the Indies when facing the impossibility of Dutch-Indonesian coexistence after independence. We will continue with Jeroen Brouwers, who experienced life in an internment camp during the Japanese occupation of Indonesia in the Second World War and reproduced those horrors in Sunken Red (1981). We end with My Father’s War (1994), a moving account by Adriaan van Dis of the difficult integration in the Netherlands of Dutch colonials who returned “home” after Indonesia’s independence.
Dutch 164 satisfies the L&S Breadth Requirement for Arts & Literature and is cross-listed as Southeast-Asian Studies C164.
Jeroen Dewulf, Tu/Th 2:00P-3:00P, 103 Moffitt Library

History 170: The Netherlands: The History of the (Two) Netherlands: Barriers and Borders

This course offers a survey of the main historical developments in the (two) Netherlands from the middle ages to the present day. Its focus will be on the early modern era, traditionally considered as the ‘Golden Age’ of the emerging Dutch Republic and the ‘Dark Age’ for the remaining Spanish Habsburg Netherlands. Even so, Rembrandt and Rubens thrived in equally fascinating global empires. The course will focus on several questions of historical interpretation, such as the meaning of the Dutch Revolt, the impact of religion and economy and the making of the Dutch and Spanish world empires. It particularly investigates the questions of existing, emerging and disappearing borders and barriers reconfiguring the many polities along the North Sea. While offering a trans-regional perspective, it also situates these developments in their wider European context.
History 170 satisfies the L&S Breadth Requirement for Historical Studies and Social and Behavioral Sciences. It also counts towards the Dutch Studies minor and major.
P.P. Rubens Visiting Professor Violet Soen, TuTh 11-12:30pm, Dwinelle 104

Dutch Studies Summer Course

Dutch 177 – The Amsterdam-Brussels Connection: History, Art and Identity in the Heart of Europe

Introduce yourself to the cultural and political identity of the Low Countries: the Netherlands and Belgium. The course begins in Amsterdam, the world’s most liberal city, from where we explore the Netherlands. After spending more than two weeks in the Netherlands, we will continue our journey in Flanders, the Dutch speaking region of Belgium, where we will be based in the city of Antwerp. On our way, we will trace important cultural, historical and political developments in European history and culture from medieval Flanders, the Dutch Golden Age, World War I and II up to contemporary multilingual, social and European identity of Belgium and the Netherlands. Daily fieldtrips take us to The Hague, Utrecht, Delft, Rotterdam, Brussels, Ghent, Bruges and many other places, where we will visit a range of world famous art museums and historical sites. Guided visits to the Dutch House of Representatives in The Hague and the European Parliament in Brussels are also included.

The Travel/Study Course Dutch 177 is open to students from all departments on the Berkeley campus as well as students from other universities, also outside the United States. It satisfies the UC Berkeley Arts & Literature or Historical Studies L&S Breadth Requirement, and it is also part of the Dutch Studies Minor or Major. Students from other departments are encouraged to consult with their advisor to see which other major/minor this program may fulfill. Visiting students are encouraged to talk to their advisor about transfer of credit to their home institution. This course has no requirements. No language-teaching is involved.

Instructors: Esmée van der Hoeven (in Amsterdam) and Jeroen Dewulf (in Antwerp). 6 units. July 2018.

 

 

Dutch Studies Major and Minor

DUTCH MAJOR:

Prerequisite: Elementary Dutch 1 and Elementary Dutch 2 or equivalent.

The student is expected to complete a minimum of 30 upper division units. Of these the following is required:

  • Advanced Dutch 110

Additional courses to be selected from the following list to complete the major:

  • The Structure of Modern Dutch 107
  • Dutch for Reading Knowledge 100
  • Conversation and Composition Dutch 125
  • Topics in Dutch Literature Dutch 140
  • Travel/Study Course Dutch 177
  • Senior Thesis Dutch 190
  • One course in the Dutch 160-series (may be repeated as topics change)
  • One course in the Dutch 170-series (may be repeated as topics change)
  • A maximum of two directly related upper-division courses outside the Department, with approval by the Program Director.

DUTCH MINOR

Prerequisite: Elementary Dutch 1 and Elementary Dutch 2 or equivalent.

The student is expected to complete 5 upper-division courses from the following:

  • Advanced Dutch 110
  • Dutch for Reading Knowledge 100
  • The Structure of Modern Dutch 107
  • Conversation and Composition Dutch 125
  • Topics in Dutch Literature Dutch 140
  • Travel/Study Course Dutch 177
  • One course in the Dutch 160-series (may be repeated as topics change)
  • One course in the Dutch 170-series (may be repeated as topics change)
  • One directly related upper-division course outside the Department, with approval by the Program Director.

 

D.E. in Dutch Studies for Graduate Students

In October 2012, the Graduate Council of University of California, Berkeley established the Designated Emphasis in Dutch Studies. The D.E. in Dutch Studies provides curricular and research resources for students who want to concentrate on Dutch Studies within their respective disciplines and have their work formally recognized in their degree designation. Designed to bring together faculty and students from different departments, the D.E. is administered by the Graduate Group in Dutch Studies and provides a unique context for rigorous cross-disciplinary research. Sponsoring departments include German, History, History of Art, Southeast Asian Studies, African American Studies, Comparative Literature, French, and Sociology. However, the D.E. is open to interested students regardless of whether their home department is officially affiliated with the D.E. The program helps advance Berkeley’s position as America’s leading Dutch Studies program and facilitate research in and cooperation with other universities in the Netherlands, Belgium, South Africa, Indonesia, and the Caribbean who also have strong Dutch Studies programs. Students applying to the D.E. must be prepared to integrate high-level research in Dutch Studies into their coursework, qualifying exam and dissertation. For more information on the D.E. in Dutch Studies, please go to the Dutch Studies website at http://dutch.berkeley.edu/programs/graduate/ or contact Prof. Jeroen Dewulf, Director of the Dutch Studies Program at jdewulf@berkeley.edu